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XXII.4 July - August 2015
Page: 7
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Beyond interaction

By Peter-Paul Verbeek
May–June 2015
DOI: 10.1145/2751314

Thanks for this great article in Interactions.

As technologies get more complex, it is more difficult to see in what sense they are extensions of our human organs. Let us take the Internet as an example. In a way, it can be seen as an extension of our human voice, because it helps us share information without us having to verbalize it. But the system is very complex and contains several elements that are not directly extensions of the human voice. Moreover, its effects go beyond just extending the amount of shared information over larger distances (can technologies be called culturally multistable? Or do we have multistable hermeneutic relations with technologies?).


“As technologies get more complex, it is more difficult to see in what sense they are extensions of our human organs.”


Ernst Kapp’s analysis is too simplistic to serve as an adequate description of what the Internet is. Kapp would see the mobile phone as an extension of the human body. While that theory seems quite plausible, instruments still reveal the inadequacies of the human body.

Arun Kumar Tripathi

Thanks, Peter, for this article. Every time I read about this topic, I regret that we have stopped teaching interaction design in my department. I think about designing a class again, teaching interaction design using your work and Stevens’s work as some of the bases. There is also the microinteraction that (Dan) Saffer talks about, and I think these elements have to be taught together, at least at the applied sciences level where I work.

Gerard van Os

LG’s G3 GUI

By Chul Lee, Kunho Lee
January–February 2015
DOI: 10.1145/2696601

Unbelievable. No user involvement into the design of a flagship product. It’s probably a perfect example of “graphic design by graphic designers for graphic designers” (© Roger Belveal).

Anonymous

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