Table of Contents

VOLUME XXII.2 March + April 2015

  • Demo Hour
    • Demo hour

      Max Rheiner, Thomas Tobler, Fabian Troxler, Seki Inoue, Keisuke Hasegawa, Yasuaki Monnai, Yasutoshi Makino, Hiroyuki Shinoda, Jules Françoise, Norbert Schnell, Riccardo Borghesi, Frédéric Bevilacqua, Tuncay Cakmak, Holger Hager

      1. Birdly Birdly is an installation that explores the experience of a bird in flight. It tries to capture the mediated flying experience with several methods. Unlike a common flight simulator, you do not control a machine—you embody a bird. To evoke this embodiment, we rely mainly on the sensory-motor…

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  • How was it made?
    • Electric flora

      Joanna Dauner, Emre Karagozler, Matthew Glisson

      Electric flora

      Describe what you made. Electric Flora is an installation that creates a space of interactivity by harvesting electrostatic energy from the human body. Our idea is to create a jungle of interactive plants that are suspended from the ceiling. When the user touches the conductive tip of the plants, made…

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  • Departments
    • Growing together with Indonesian SIGCHI

      Eunice Sari, Adi Tedjasaputra, Tuomo Kujala

      Growing together with Indonesian SIGCHI

      On May 19, 2014, the Indonesian SIGCHI chapter was born. Like all babies, this chapter was not born instantly. The idea was conceived back in early 2002, when we started our work in HCI in Indonesia. Many still considered HCI an alien concept from the West at that time. In…

    • Community calendar

      INTR Staff

      Community calendar

      March HRI 2015 – 10th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (Portland, USA) Conference Dates: March 2–5, 2015 http://humanrobotinteraction.org/2015/ VISGRAPP 2015 – 10th International Joint Conference on Computer Vision, Imaging and Computer Graphics Theory and Applications (Berlin, Germany) Conference Dates: March 11–14, 2015 http://www.visigrapp.org/ CSCW 2015 – 18th ACM conference…

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  • Columns
    • Practical products for centenarian spies

      Mark Blythe

      Practical products for centenarian spies

      Mark Blythe has jumped on the design fiction bandwagon and written a novel called The Centenarians. Lacking the decency to leave it in a drawer, he is shamelessly sharing the excerpt below. Annabel and Boris Bide, the 100-year-old heroes, are sitting at the desk of a Ministry official ... “Back…

    • Device multiplicity demands magical continuity

      Uday Gajendar

      Device multiplicity demands magical continuity

      Hello, welcome to my new column! It’s my hope to add to the ever-evolving discourse on design through the reflections conveyed here. My belief is that through “some radical notions” we can reinterpret the ordinary to achieve the extraordinary, perhaps in unexpected ways, and advance design progress in the world.…

    • Teaching confidence in process

      Jon Kolko

      Teaching confidence in process

      The design process always performs. Following the broad design process always results in new ideas, grounded in both the reality of a problem space and the tacit knowledge of the designer. But there’s no guarantee that the ideas are any good, and in many ways, this presents a challenge for…

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  • Special topic
    • From field to office

      m.c. schraefel

      From field to office

      Recently, colleagues and I proposed the term wellth to describe a focus on health as a foundation for performance rather than as a preventative for illness [1]. Wellth foregrounds the “brain-body connection”: The state of the brain is mirrored in the state of the rest of the system to which…

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  • Day in the Lab
    • Human-computer interaction lab @KAIST

      Seongkook Heo, Sunjun Kim, Jaehyun Han, Jiseong Gu, Jaeyeon Lee, Jeongmin Son, Jin Jung, Eunhye Youn, Sunggeun Ahn, Geehyuk Lee

      How do you describe your lab to visitors? The name HCI Lab is in fact too big for our small lab. Among various areas in HCI, we mainly work on new interaction techniques for new types of computers. While we are a computer science lab, we also make new hardware…

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  • Forums
    • Rethinking autism and technology

      Christopher Frauenberger

      Rethinking autism and technology

      A common adage in autism research goes, “If you have seen one child with autism, you have seen one child with autism.” Autism is a neuro-developmental disorder that is extraordinarily diverse in its manifestations. What defines the scope of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) are impaired social and communication skills and…

    • Interaction design meets architectural thinking

      Mikael Wiberg

      Interaction design meets architectural thinking

      The architecture that surrounds us defines a crucial part of our everyday lives. It shapes and defines the frames for our lives, the rooms in which we live, work, socialize, do our shopping, and spend our leisure time [1]. Architecture is the classic, established approach to the design of our…

    • Children as participants in design and evaluation

      Janet Read

      Children as participants in design and evaluation

      The HCI community has long advocated the use of user studies to test and evaluate interactive systems. There is much to be learned by watching users interact with systems, both as novices and as experienced users. It is generally thought that an expert inspection of a system is a poor…

    • Reshaping the limits of design in HCI

      Daniela Rosner

      Reshaping the limits of design in HCI

      Perhaps more than any other area of HCI, design research faces an identity crisis. While some researchers extend human-centered design (turning cycles of observation, ideation, prototyping, and testing into design recommendations and guidelines), other researchers favor studies of design (empirical studies of design processes). Still others offer a kind of…

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  • Features
    • HCI and sports

      Stina Nylander, Jakob Tholander, Florian Mueller, Joseph Marshall

      HCI and sports

      Sports are an important part of many people’s lives. They are rewarding and motivating, but people appreciate them for a variety of reasons: Sports are personal and social, are fun but have health benefits, and can also be both enjoyable and painful. While motivation, fun, and sociality are elements often…

    • From field to office

      m.c. schraefel

      From field to office

      Recently, colleagues and I proposed the term wellth to describe a focus on health as a foundation for performance rather than as a preventative for illness [1]. Wellth foregrounds the “brain-body connection”: The state of the brain is mirrored in the state of the rest of the system to which…

    • Designing training games for soccer

      Mads Jensen, Majken Rasmussen, Florian Mueller, Kaj Grønbæk

      Designing training games for soccer

      Advancements in wearable and ubiquitous computing have exposed the interaction design community to a new perspective on sports. As a result, increasing effort has been directed toward creating technology-enhanced systems that can improve sports experiences. So far these technologies have focused primarily on gathering data on a single user’s performance,…

    • Untangling running

      Paweł Woźniak, Kristina Knaving, Staffan Björk, Morten Fjeld

      Untangling running

      Since running has low entry costs and is widely available, it has become a key fitness activity included in local and national health strategies. Training programs intended to help people start running are reported in the mainstream press, attracting interest from people intrigued by the sport’s health and leisure benefits.…

    • Motion games in real sports environments

      Raine Kajastila, Perttu Hämäläinen

      Motion games in real sports environments

      The past decade has brought about interesting developments in combining video games, sports, and exercise. Motion games, also known as exergames or active video games, have become mainstream thanks to technologies like Microsoft Kinect, PlayStation Move, and Nintendo Wii. Unfortunately, commercial games are often optimized for an average customer facing…

    • The big hole in HCI research

      Vassilis Kostakos

      The big hole in HCI research

      At the 2014 CHI conference, my group published a paper that presented a bibliometric analysis of the conference itself over the past 20 years [1]. The extent to which the conference reflects the entire field of HCI is debatable, but it is acknowledged that this is the flagship conference of…

    • On the importance and implications of studying technology non-use

      Eric Baumer, Jenna Burrell, Morgan Ames, Jed Brubaker, Paul Dourish

      On the importance and implications of studying technology non-use

      Quit Facebook Day. Paraguayan children indifferent to their OLPC XO laptop. Digitally disconnected residents of Sub-Saharan Africa. Facebook pages of the deceased. Each of these in some way draws attention to technology non-use. While researchers have explored questions around non-use for some time [1,2], the dominant discourse in HCI still…

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  • Cover story
    • Design for user empowerment

      Richard Ladner

      As an accessibility researcher, I have noticed that some of the best work comes when there are people with disabilities on the design and development team, contributing to all aspects of the design and implementation, not just as participants in user studies. I call this strong engagement by users design…

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  • Visual thinking gallery
    • Inspiration from nature

      Eli Blevis

      Inspiration from nature

      Genre: Reflection on color, variability, and imperfection as principles of design form The beauty of natural objects manifests in natural variability and perfectly imperfect surfaces and textures. Mass-produced artifacts of digital interactivity seldom have such qualities and their manufacture generally targets uniformity of form. ©2015 ACM1072-5520/15/0300$15.00 Permission to make digital…

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