Collaboration and education

XVII.4 July + August 2010
Page: 30
Digital Citation

Learning to succeed at e-government


Authors:
Ulrike Rivett, Melissa Loudon

Most e-Government projects end either in partial or total failure [1]. When the reasons for this are investigated, we are told that systems have failed because they try to force unwanted or contentious change in organizational processes, or because the technology requirements, such as hardware and connectivity, did not exist or were not maintainable due to limited human, technical, and financial resources. In general the literature on information and communication technology failure suggests that failure occurs because some aspect of the system context—social, technical, or political—is inadequately understood. While such reasons are valid, our view is that the stubborn persistence…




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