Demo Hour

XXIII.4 July - August 2016
Page: 10
Digital Citation


Authors:
Cindy Kao, Paul Johns, Asta Roseway, Mary Czerwinski, Lahiru Priyadarshana, Victoria Porter, Juan Carrascal, Aaron Visser, Roel Vertegaal, Sarah Homewood, Gillian Smith, April Grow, Chenxi Liu, Lea Albaugh, Jennifer Mankoff, Jim McCann

1. Tattio

Tattio is a fabrication process that draws from current body-decoration processes (e.g., jewelry-like metallic temporary tattoos) for the creation of on-skin technology. The fabrication process generates functional components such as NFC tags, circuitry, and thermochromic tattoos, while maintaining the aesthetics and user experience of existing metallic temporary tattoos. The fabrication process is low cost, accessible, and customizable; we seek to enable individuals to design, make, and wear their own skin-technology creations.

https://vimeo.com/cindykao/tattio

Kao, H.-L. C., Johns, P., Roseway, A., and Czerwinski, M., Tattio: Fabrication of aesthetic and functional temporary tattoos. Proc. of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, New York, 2016, 3699–3702.

Cindy Hsin-Liu Kao, MIT Media Lab
cindykao@media.mit.edu

Paul Johns, Microsoft Research
paul.johns@microsoft.com

Asta Roseway, Microsoft Research
astar@microsoft.com

Mary Czerwinski, Microsoft Research
marycz@microsoft.com

ins01.gif Tattio allows users to create their own on-skin technology designs.

2. MagicWand

MagicWand is a handheld cylindrical display object. It features two flexible OLED screens that provide a continuous display surface covering most of its lateral area. Its shape and size allow it to be used as a wand, offering rich gestural interaction. We used MagicWand in a gaming scenario to explore how its form factor affords different actions from those of a traditional smartphone. As a game controller, MagicWand can display different tools and characters, depending on the context. Its physical and visual affordances make it easier for the player to discover the right gestures for advancing through the game.

http://www.dropbox.com/s/rvly3jvvfg2scoc/MagicWand.mp4?dl=0

Priyadarshana, L-L., Porter, V., Carrascal, J-P., Visser, A., Vertegaal, R. MagicWand: Exploring physical affordances with a handheld cylindrical display object. Proc. of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, New York, 2016, 3762–3765.

Lahiru Lakmal Priyadarshana, Victoria Porter, Juan Pablo Carrascal, Aaron Visser, and Roel Vertegaal, Human Media Lab, Queen’s University
roel@cs.queensu.ca

ins02.gif IMU data is used to orient graphics on the device toward the user to provide the illusion of 3D-motion parallax.

3. Maintaining Relationships with Our Devices

Despite the current strong commercial trend toward wearable technology, this performance considers the role that unworn personal devices have played in our lives. The performance explores the distance we have had between our bodies and our devices and proposes that this distance has given us the space to form meaningful relationships. The parent-child metaphor used within the performance suggests the design of mobile devices and accessories that maintain and enhance our relationships with our devices.

http://sarahhomewood.com/ixd/MaintainingRelationships.html

https://vimeo.com/159113631

Homewood, S. Maintaining relationships with our devices. Proc. of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, New York, 2016, 273–276.

Sarah Homewood, Malmö University
sf.homewood@gmail.com

ins03.gif Screen maintenance is self-maintenance.
ins04.gif A cradle that rocks and charges your device.

4. Threadsteading

Threadsteading is a two-player territorial control game for quilting and embroidery machines. The game is played entirely on the machine, with input via a custom-mounted controller and output as a tangible, sewn artifact. Gameplay is turn-based and designed around the unique constraints of the platform and craft. Because quilting requires unbroken paths of thread, each turn must pick up where the previous turn left off. The rules encourage players to have an even spread of lines across the surface, since ideally a quilt has neither large unsewn portions nor multiple stitched lines on top of each other.


Gameplay is designed around the unique constraints of the platform and craft.


https://www.disneyresearch.com/project/threadsteading/

Albaugh, L., Grow, A., Liu, C., McCann, J., Mankoff, J., and Smith, G. Threadsteading: Playful interaction for textile fabrication devices. Proc. of the 2016 CHI Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, New York, 2016, 285–288.

Gillian Smith, Northeastern University
gi.smith@neu.edu

April Grow, Disney Research Pittsburgh

Chenxi Liu, Disney Research Pittsburgh

Lea Albaugh, Disney Research Pittsburgh

Jen Mankoff, Carnegie Mellon University

Jim McCann, Disney Research Pittsburgh

ins05.gif The final score being sewn onto the quilt machine version of Threadsteading. One player’s symbol is the spiral, the other’s a flower.
ins06.gif A closeup of the game being played on the embroidery machine.

©2016 ACM  1072-5220/16/07  $15.00

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