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VI.2 March/April 1999
Page: 7
Digital Citation

What’s happening


Authors:
Jennifer Bruer

back to top  Thought Foundry wins Gold Award at 1999 PhotoDisc International Imagery in Design Competition

Thought Foundry (http://www.ThoughtFoundry.com) won the Gold Award for the internet category of the 1999 Photodisc International Imagery in Design Competition. The Gold award winning web site was designed for the Kaiser Consulting group, a healthcare consulting company based in Denver, Colorado.

More than 1,100 entries were received from countries including the United States, Canada, Australia, Brazil, China, Germany, Great Britain and Spain. The competition was open to professionals in creative industries and the competition was created to recognize those who best portrayed quality design, creativity, graphics, image manipulation and communication effectiveness.

The independent panel of jurors included four prominent industry professionals with expertise in print, multimedia and web design: Clement Mok - Clement Mok Designs, Martin Venezky - Appetite Engineers, Bob Aufuldish - Aufuldish & Warinner, and Diane Fenster, Illustrator.

The prize winning entry was designed using the Thought Foundry Process™. Thought Foundry Process ™ offers a revolutionary way for companies, worldwide, to obliterate the confusion and leverage the power of interactive media to produce measurable, marketing results. The Thought Foundry Process™ utilizes the best of Technology, Marketing and Design to create traditional and interactive media to optimize the user experience, build, enhance and promote a company's brand.

The Thought Foundry Process™ utilizes the customized Thought Foundry Project Blueprint™ to focus on a company's core business, market, and customer niches to generate interactive and traditional media thereby producing a measurable impact on any company's overall marketing plan.

To view the prize winning entry, point your web browser to:

http://www.thoughtfoundry.com/assets/WWW_Intra_Extranet_sites/kaiser_www/index.html

back to top  Call for Participation

Creativity & Cognition 3, 1999
Intersections and Collaborations : Art, Music, Technology and Science

In October 1999, Creativity and Cognition 3, an ACM SIGCHI International Workshop, will take place at Burleigh Court, Loughborough University in Loughborough, England.

Invited speakers are: Marvin Minsky, leading scientist, early pioneer of Artificial Intelligence and author of The Society of Mind;

Harold Cohen, leading artist, early developer of computer-based art and creator of "Aaron" a computer program that generates drawings and paintings.

Proposals for the presentation and demonstration of collaborative ventures between artists, composers, scientists and technologists are invited. These can include interactive events, Internet/computer-based demonstrations and joint presentations. Collaborative explorations which have moved beyond the existing technology and led to new ways of working are especially welcome. The workshop will be a three day program of presentations, demonstrations and poster displays.

bullet.gif Important Dates

The event : October 11-13th, 1999

Deadline date for submissions : March 26th 1999

Notification of Acceptance : May 28th, 1999

Final Copy Date for Proceedings: June 25th, 1999

All submissions should be in SIGCHI standard format

Event proposals and paper submissions should be sent to the Program Chair:

  • Linda Candy email : l.candy@lboro.ac.uk
  • Creativity and Cognition 1999 International Workshop
  • LUTCHI Research Centre, Loughborough University,
  • Ashby Road, Loughborough, Leicestershire,
  • LE11 3TU. UK
  • For further information and inquiries, please contact
  • General Chair: Ernest Edmonds
  • e.a.edmonds@lboro.ac.uk
  • Program Chair: Linda Candy
  • l.candy@lboro.ac.uk

back to top  Errata

In the january/february 1999 issue of interactions we mistakenly reversed the captions in figures 2 and 3 of John Ims' article "Instituting Integrated Workflow Development" (pp. 58–69). Below are the figures with the correct captions.

Also, the acknowledgements section of Teresa Cleary's article "Communicating Customer Information at Cabletron Systems, Inc." (pp. 44–49) should have included Alicia Flanders.

We apologize for these errors.

Figure 2. The project methodology incorporated both the elements of Object Oriented development and the human factors process. To date, this has been a 2-year project with more than 600,000 lines of code generated and a development team size of more than 40 people. At any given time, all phases of development (data gathering, analysis, design, testing) occurred simultaneously for different functional deliverables (inquiry, maintenance, financial transactions, and new account setup).

Figure 3. Our vision for the new call center processing schematic. A customer contacts the call center associate. The associate accesses a variety of applications to address the customer's requests but is unaware that separate TA2000 applications exist. Data sharing and cross-application workflows are supported. Automated updates to AWD are supported. Interaction styles across functions for form filling, file maintenance, inquiry and processing functions are consistent and support fluid transitions within and between work sequences.

back to top  Figures

F2Figure 2. The project methodology incorporated both the elements of Object Oriented development and the human factors process. To date, this has been a 2-year project with more than 600,000 lines of code generated and a development team size of more than 40 people. At any given time, all phases of development (data gathering, analysis, design, testing) occurred simultaneously for different functional deliverables (inquiry, maintenance, financial transactions, and new account setup).

F3Figure 3. Our vision for the new call center processing schematic. A customer contacts the call center associate. The associate accesses a variety of applications to address the customer's requests but is unaware that separate TA2000 applications exist. Data sharing and cross-application workflows are supported. Automated updates to AWD are supported. Interaction styles across functions for form filling, file maintenance, inquiry and processing functions are consistent and support fluid transitions within and between work sequences.

back to top 

©1999 ACM  1072-5220/99/0300  $5.00

Permission to make digital or hard copies of all or part of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation on the first page. To copy otherwise, to republish, to post on servers or to redistribute to lists, requires prior specific permission and/or a fee.

The Digital Library is published by the Association for Computing Machinery. Copyright © 1999 ACM, Inc.

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