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XXIV.2 March + April 2017
Page: 74
Digital Citation

From the BBC micro to micro:bit and beyond


Authors:
Yvonne Rogers, Venus Shum, Nicolai Marquardt, Susan Lechelt, Rose Johnson, Howard Baker, Matt Davies

  Many British people remember fondly the BBC Micro from their childhood in the 1980s. They spent hours playing video games like Frogger and Pac-Man while also learning to program using the BASIC language. The computer’s colorful graphics and chunky keyboard, with a row of orange function keys at the top, made it distinctive, accessible, and user friendly. It inspired a generation to learn about computing, programming, digital music, and video games.   Insights In the 1970s, the microcomputer revolution was changing working life. Television programs like the BBC’s 1978 Horizon special Now the Chips Are…




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