Features

XIX.3 May + June 2012
Page: 44
Digital Citation

From plastic to pixels


Authors:
Leah Findlater, Jacob Wobbrock

Touchscreen devices have exploded onto the commercial stage in the past decade, most prolifically in smartphones, but in other forms as well, including tablets and interactive tabletops. While touchscreen devices have enormous appeal, one drawback is clear to anyone who has entered more than a few characters on one: Typing is slow, uncomfortable, and inaccurate, and it generally pales in comparison to typing on physical keyboards. A touchscreen’s flat, glassy surface means that even expert typists have to look down at their fingers instead of feeling for the home row keys to situate their hands. Adding to the challenge: Whereas…




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