Features

XXI.3 May-June 2014
Page: 40
Digital Citation

Reducing legacy bias in gesture elicitation studies


Authors:
Meredith Ringel Morris, Andreea Danielescu, Steven Drucker, Danyel Fisher, Bongshin Lee, m.c. schraefel, Jacob O. Wobbrock
Gesture-based systems are becoming ubiquitous. Tablets, phones, large displays, and even laptop computers are now commonly equipped with multitouch-recognizing screens. Third-party accessories like the Wii Nunchuck and the Xbox Kinect can also detect rich gestural input. To design for these increasingly prolific gesture-based systems, we need to understand how to identify and design good gestures in these contexts (a “good” gesture may be one that meets design criteria such as discoverability, ease-of-performance, memorability, or reliability). Gesture elicitation is one promising approach to this challenge. Gesture elicitation (e.g., [1]) is a technique that emerges from the field of participatory design. End…




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