Borrowing, heavily, from outside disciplines

XVI.6 November + December 2009
Page: 64
Digital Citation

FEATURELearning from architecture


Authors:
Brett Ingram

If you are reading this article, you probably work or study in a field that can generally be referred to as interaction design. No matter the specific role, we are all working toward producing an end product even as we work on different aspects of it. This product typically involves a digital experience and a form of communication, and it increasingly includes an embodiment in the physical world. That impact on and connection with the physical world is becoming ever more important, and it begs reflection upon the holistic thinking and oversight that goes into developing physical artifacts and environments.…




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