Demo Hour

XXIII.6 November-December 2016
Page: 10
Digital Citation


Authors:
Doenja Oogjes, Miguel Alonso, Ron Wakkary, Joanne Lo, Doris Lee, Nathan Wong, David Bui, Eric Paulos, Cally Gatehouse, Alyssa DiSalvo, Leila Watson, Zishan Yu, Peter Worthy, Jason Weigel, Stephen Viller, Ben Matthews

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For this Demo Hour, we present projects from three tracks at DIS 2016, held June 4–8 at QUT in Brisbane, Australia.

The Provocations and Works-in-Progress (PWiP) track showcases novel, in-progress, and thought-provoking research. Featured projects: Lyssna and Minimize

The Demos track invites interface and system demonstrations, novel gadgets, techno-craft, and other interactive experiences that critically or creatively explore the conference themes. Featured project: Skintillates

The Design Works track is a venue to present the design outcome of a specific research project. The submissions included the artifact together with a framing text highlighting the relationship between practice and research. Featured project: Feral Screens

Chairs:

PWiP: Margot Brereton and Elise van den Hoven
Demos: Lian Loke and Markus Rittenbruch
Design Works: Jennifer Seevinck and Gavin Sade

back to top  1. Lyssna

Lyssna is a diegetic prototype in the form of a hearing aid for your refrigerator that aims at reintegrating the lost aspects of food. It is attached to the refrigerator door and rotates every once in a while to get your attention. When it is moved across the door of your fridge, you hear the sounds of the food inside. Lyssna creates a unique sound for every food item that changes over time, representing the state of freshness and accompanying flavor of the food. You can explore the contents of your fridge, get inspired, and compose a personal symphony of tastes.

http://lyssna.doenjaoogjes.com/

https://vimeo.com/148558555

Oogjes, D., Bruns, M., and Wakkary, R. Lyssna: A design fiction to reframe food waste. Proc. of the 2016 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems. ACM, New York, 2016.

Doenja Oogjes, Simon Fraser University and Eindhoven University of Technology, oogjes@sfu.ca
Miguel Bruns Alonso, Eindhoven University of Technology, mbruns@tue.nl
Ron Wakkary, Simon Fraser University and Eindhoven University of Technology, rwakkary@sfu.ca

ins01.gif Lyssna, a hearing aid for your refrigerator.

back to top  2. Skintillates

Skintillates is a wearable technology that mimics tattoos—the oldest and most commonly used on-skin displays in human culture. This technology is capable of providing many forms of sensing and display, and it interfaces with other electronic devices. Just like traditional temporary tattoos often worn by children and adults, Skintillates flex naturally with the user’s skin. Our simple fabrication technique enables users to freely design and print with a full range of colors to create customized designs for on-skin sensing and display applications.

http://www.joannelo.com/researchprojects/2016/3/30/skintillates-1

https://youtu.be/SxZnETru8mA

Lo, J. et al. Skintillates: Designing and creating epidermal interactions. Proc. of the 2016 ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems. ACM, New York, 2016.

Joanne Lo, Doris Jung Lin Lee, Nathan Wong, David Bui, and Eric Paulos, University of California, Berkeley
jlo@berkeley.edu

ins02.gif Skintillates devices are thin, flexible, and can be functionally and aesthetically customized.

back to top  3. Feral Screens

As cities are transformed into networked publics through the installation of digital communication technologies, will they be able to accommodate and support the plurality of needs and desires of the people who live there? This project looks at urban screens through a critical lens by applying queer theory to an autoethnographic design process: The metaphor of “going feral” is used to design and build ambiguous devices that are then documented in public spaces. These feral screens are used as a prompt for reflection and to imagine alternative communication devices, networks, and practices.

http://publicpixels.net

Gatehouse, C. Feral screens: Queering urban networked publics. Proc. of the 2016 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems. ACM, New York, 2016, 99–104.

Cally Gatehouse, Northumbria University
cally.gatehouse@northumbria.ac.uk

ins03.gif Feral screens question our relationship with public urban technologies.

A prototype Internet of Things application designed to assist users in minimizing their wardrobe.


back to top  4. Minimize

Minimize is a prototype Internet of Things application designed to assist users in minimizing their wardrobe. Its purpose is to instigate behavioral and attitudinal change with regard to minimizing, and to ease the process of parting with unused sentimental items. The application comprises RFID-tagged clothing, a mini-closet display, StoryLamp, and a website. Each day, users scan the items they decide to wear. Personal wearing data is collected, forming a larger picture of their clothing habits. This information is then meaningfully presented back to them in both digital and tangible ways.

http://s4325075-minimalist.uqcloud.net

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJwV88OgcCA

DiSalvo, A., Watson, L., Yu, Z., Worthy, P., Weigel, J., Viller, S., and Matthews, B. StoryLamp: Sentimentality is killing the world. Proc. of the 2016 ACM Conference Companion Publication on Designing Interactive Systems (DIS ‘16 Companion). ACM, New York, NY, 141–144.

Alyssa DiSalvo, Leila Watson, Zishan Yu, Peter Worthy, Jason Weigel, Stephen Viller, and Ben Matthews, University of Queensland
alyssa.disalvo@uq.net.au

ins04.gif Minimize’s mini-closet display. LED lights over each item indicate how long ago the item was last worn, and how appropriate the item is for the current temperature (based on past wearing data).
ins05.gif The mini-closet’s outer display, which confronts the user with neglected items.

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©2016 ACM  1072-5520/16/11  $15.00

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