Demo Hour

XXVI.6 November - December 2019
Page: 8
Digital Citation


Authors:
Paulina Yurman, Marloes Bhömer, Renee Noortman, Britta Schulte, Paul Marshall, Saskia Bakker, Anna Cox, Alexis Begnoche, Jurrian van Geest, Beth Grimmer, Thijmen Langendam, Nanda Schellingerhout, Martin Havranek, Aadjan van der Helm, Wouter van der Hoog, Tomasz Jaskiewicz, Jakob Lehr

back to top  1. A Smartphone in the Nursery

How can experiments in design explore the role of smartphones for mothers and young children? How can these designs be used to prompt conversations and explore potentials for change? This research used experimental and suggestive artifacts as conversational probes, inviting participants to interpret them and thus to tell of their own experiences using smartphones during childcare—practices that are often private and ridden with complexity. Informed by critical design, feminist, and psychoanalytic perspectives, the research engages with ambivalences toward the presence of smartphones in the world of mother and infant, portraying mothers as complex users of technology.

Yurman, P. A smartphone in the nursery. Proc. of the 4th Biennial Research Through Design Conference. 2019; https://figshare.com/articles/A_smartphone_in_the_nursery/7855757

Yurman, P. Designing for ambivalence: Mothers, transitional objects and smartphones. Proc. of the 2017 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, New York, 2017.

www.yurman.co.uk

https://vimeo.com/330331412

Paulina Yurman, Goldsmiths, University of London

p.yurman@gold.ac.uk

ins01.gif Uncanny Pet uses the metaphor of a sleeping pet to invite mother and child to take a break from the phone. It snores.
ins02.gif Herby is a phone on wheels that gets irritated when used as a toy, protesting “I am not a toy” or “Take me to your mum.”

back to top  2. A Measurable Factor Sets the Conditions of Its Operation

This is an ongoing research project and series of publicly exhibited materials originally developed through the Stanley Picker Research Fellowship at Kingston University. The project aims to rethink the ways in which shoes are designed by shirking traditional approaches. Instead, it employs an engineering method based on structural parameters, informed by biomechanical factors, required to support a high-heeled foot while in motion. In this project, the shoe is approached as a constellation of interlinking areas of support, producing genuinely new opportunities for configuring the shoe.

ten Bhömer, M. The parameters required to support a woman in motion. Proc. of the 4th Biennial Research Through Design Conference. 2019; https://figshare.com/articles/The_parameters_required_to_support_a_woman_in_motion/7855793

Jeżowska, K. Reinventing the high heel. Disegno. Feb. 4, 2014; https://www.disegnodaily.com/article/reinventing-the-high-heel

www.marloestenbhomer.com

https://vimeo.com/120041036

https://vimeo.com/90629458

Marloes ten Bhömer, Kingston University

info@marloestenbhomer.com

ins03.gif White Prototypes are a series of testing shoes.
ins04.gif Constellation4 depicts a particular constellation of interlinking foot and ground contact areas of support for the foot.
ins05.gif Bluepanelshoe is one outcome of connecting a constellation of contact areas into an actual shoe.

back to top  3. HawkEye

HawkEye is a design fiction probe that was deployed with eight participants for three weeks. Comprising a physical control panel, HawkEye is provided by a fictional elder-care company and deployed in the participant’s home. Participants take on the fictional role of an informal caregiver caring for “Annie,” a person with dementia. Once the system is deployed, the participants receive messages on Annie’s well-being and set parameters for the different technologies installed in her smart home. After three weeks of deployment, the participants were interviewed in order to gain insights on the use of this kind of futurist technology.

Noortman, R., Schulte, B., Marshall, P., Bakker, S., and Cox, A. HawkEye - Deploying a design fiction probe. Proc. of 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM, New York, 2019; https://doi.org/10.1145/3290605.3300652

Renee Noortman, Eindhoven University of Technology

r.r.noortman@student.tue.nl

Britta F. Schulte, University College London

Paul Marshall, University of Bristol

Saskia Bakker, Eindhoven University of Technology

Anna L. Cox, University College London

ins06.gif The artifact was crafted to look like existing medical devices.
ins07.gif The concept of the fictional company HawkEye was developed to support the narrative.
ins08.gif HawkEye was deployed with eight individuals in their own homes, to investigate how it would fit into domestic routines.

back to top  4. Co-Zone

The cubicle farm, once seen as the pinnacle of office efficiency, is now being replaced by co-working spaces. These offices are defined by their ability to cater to a wide array of disciplines by “flexing” to the needs of office workers. The Co-Zone combines the function and organization provided by a co-working space with the opportunity for individuals to customize their workspace according to their personal needs and preferences. The movable Co-Zone panels communicate data about climate and their configuration to other projects in the interactive environment.


Co-Zone combines the function and organization provided by a co-working space with the opportunity for individuals to customize their workspace.


Interactive Environment projects installed. Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Metropolitan Solutions. News. Jan. 31, 2019; https://www.ams-institute.org/news/interactive-environment-students-install-projects-ams-institute/

Interactive Environment students present complete office furnishings at AMS. TU Delft. News. Jan. 24, 2019; https://www.tudelft.nl/en/2019/io/january/interactive-environment-students-present-complete-office-furnishings-at-ams/

https://interactive-environments.nl/co-zone/

https://vimeo.com/316566365

Students: Alexis Begnoche, Jurrian van Geest, Beth Grimmer, Thijmen Langendam, Nanda Schellingerhout Coaches: Martin Havranek, Aadjan van der Helm, Wouter van der Hoog, Tomasz Jaskiewicz, Jakob Lehr, University of Technology Delft

A.J.C.vanderHelm@tudelft.nl

ins09.gif Interactive modules include an internal and external climate display, a heating unit, and an occupancy indicator.
ins10.gif The space at the bottom can be used for bag storage and provides power outlets to charge personal devices.
ins11.gif The peg-board allows for Co-Zone customization to cater to various work-related activities.

back to top 

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