Table of Contents

VOLUME XXVII.2 March - April 2020

  • WELCOME
    • We’re moving in. We’re moving forward. The floor is yours!

      Mikael Wiberg, Alex Taylor, Daniela Rosner

      We want to take this opportunity to introduce ourselves as the new editorial team for ACM Interactions magazine. Over the past couple of months, we—Mikael, Alex, and Daniela—have worked closely together to form a shared vision for how we want Interactions to evolve over the coming issues. The conversations…

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  • Demo Hour
    • Demo hour

      Kongpyung Moon, Peng Gao, Jessica In, Ruairi Glynn, Laura Rosado, studio RLON, Freddie Hong

      1. CuGo CuGo is a tangible platform where human and robot are encouraged to participate in achieving a shared goal. It consists of a game board, on which modular, reconfigurable robots perform unpredictable movements, as well as passive blocks that are moved by both human and robot players. As…

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  • What are you reading?
    • What are you reading? Mariam Asad

      Mariam Asad

      What are you reading? Mariam Asad

      I've been slowly rereading The Dispossessed by Ursula K. Le Guin, which I read for the first time as I started to write my dissertation. The novel describes a scientist from a small utopian world who travels to another planet—one with strong echoes of contemporary Western capitalism—and tries to reconcile…

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  • Blog@IX
    • Machine learning applications: Reflections on mental health assessment and ethics

      Anja Thieme, Danielle Belgrave, Akane Sano, Gavin Doherty

      Machine learning applications: Reflections on mental health assessment and ethics

      As part of the ACII 2019 conference in Cambridge, U.K., we ran a workshop on "Machine Learning for Affective Disorders" (ML4AD; http://mlformentalhealth.com/). The well-attended workshop had an extensive program, including an opening keynote by UC Irvine assistant professor of psychological science Stephen Schueller, presentations by authors of accepted workshop…

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  • How was it made?
    • How was it made? WiFi impressionist

      Richard Vijgen

      How was it made? WiFi impressionist

      Describe what you made. We are literally surrounded with data. Thousands of wireless signals from cellphones, computers, and various digital infrastructure fill the space around us with information. Through our devices we can interact with this ethereal world but we can never see it, touch it, or experience it directly.…

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  • Columns
    • Service design and blind mice

      Jung-Joo Lee

      Service design and blind mice

      If design's buzzword of the early 2000s was UX, one of its buzzwords of the latest decade must be service design. Service design is gaining greater traction in HCI with the rise of the Internet of Things, cloud computing, social computing, and so on, which requires a systemic perspective…

    • Blurry boundaries

      Uday Gajendar

      Blurry boundaries

      Author's note: With my final essay for this column we're taking an experimental approach, to underscore the original intent of staging exploratory conversations and seeing what emerges. I hope you enjoy it! What if you had a doppelgänger at work—not one who looked like you, but one who behaved…

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  • Day in the Lab
    • Bureau of difficult things

      Pepijn Verburg, Tijs Duel

      Bureau of difficult things

      How do you describe your lab to visitors? Within our studio there is a healthy blend of design and engineering. Design drives our engineering processes and vice versa. We often do work early on in the innovation process, which requires constant iteration, reflection, and multidisciplinary work: One day you are…

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  • Forums
    • Interaction and architecture is dead. Long live architectural interactivity!

      Mikael Wiberg

      Interaction and architecture is dead. Long live architectural interactivity!

      In 2015, I initiated this forum, devoted to understanding and exploring the intersection of interaction and architecture. Lots of things have happened since then. Not only do we have more examples of how these two strands are increasingly intertwined, in practice and in research, but we also have new…

    • ‘It just has to be’: Building relationships with Jeanno Gaussi

      Jeanno Gaussi

      ‘It just has to be’: Building relationships with Jeanno Gaussi

      For those of us who design, collaborations often pervade our everyday practices—materializing as modes of teamwork, allyship, solidarity, or struggle. Below, Interactions editor Daniela Rosner speaks with artist Jeanno Gaussi on the theme of collaboration. Having grown up in Kabul, Delhi, and Berlin, Gaussi expands our thinking on this…

    • Using illustration to create more inclusive user interfaces for older adults

      Catarina Correia, Elsa Oliveira, Francisco Nunes

      Using illustration to create more inclusive user interfaces for older adults

      Designing inclusive technologies should be a core value of the HCI community. In an era when we design technologies that deeply impact users' lives, we are also responsible for doing everything in our power to avoid discrimination and promote appropriate treatment for everyone. However, designing inclusive technologies is easier…

    • Toward growable computer games

      Raphael Kim, Siobhan Thomas, Roland van Dierendonck, Christopher Wood, Stefan Poslad

      Toward growable computer games

      In recent years, helped by the widening accessibility of the knowledge, tools, and materials of biotechnology outside of professional biology labs, a growing number of HCI researchers and practitioners have been exploring the notion of integrating nonhuman living materials with interactive computer systems [1]. Insights Biological integration provides…

    • Social work thinking for UX and AI design

      Desmond Patton

      Social work thinking for UX and AI design

      What if, instead of solely looking for the best AI talent, tech companies and startups created a Chief Social Work Officer? This is the question Greg Epstein posed to me during our conversation about why AI needs more social workers [1]. My response: The social work difference is that…

    • Redacted letters to the other Korea

      Lisa Min

      Redacted letters to the other Korea

      Dear Reader, This essay is an exploration of redaction as method, with particular emphasis on the process of designing such a method. The idea emerged from a closed workshop organized at UC Berkeley in May 2019 where scholars came together to discuss some of the pressing security and ethical…

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  • Community square
    • Publication matters

      Julie Williamson

      Publication matters

      The way that ACM archives publications is changing. Although our working practice as authors, reviewers, and readers must adapt to accommodate these changes, the benefits of a more resilient, flexible, and accessible archive are worth such an effort. Separating content from presentation. The key motivation for changing our publication…

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  • Features
    • Automated driving: Getting and keeping the human in the loop

      Christian Janssen, Andrew Kun

      Automated driving: Getting and keeping the human in the loop

      Automated vehicles are sometimes seen as fully replacing a human driver, particularly in the popular press and in nonscientific conversation. However, although there are successes in automated vehicles, no systems can yet achieve this. Instead, we argue that human-automation interaction in the context of vehicles should be considered as…

    • Computer multitasking in the classroom: Reduced learning versus modern living

      Morten Hertzum, Lennart Björneborn

      Computer multitasking in the classroom: Reduced learning versus modern living

      Computers have entered the classroom. They have largely replaced pen and paper for note taking, at least in European and North American universities. In addition, many students read course texts on their computer rather than in hard copy, and in-class exercises rely on student access to online information or…

    • Special topic: Inbodied interaction: Introduction

      m.c. schraefel

      Special topic: Inbodied interaction: Introduction

      Inbodied Interaction HCI practitioners are increasingly interested in designing interactive technologies to support the body. At the CHI conference, research around health in particular has grown over the past decade. Once consisting of a session or two on health-related papers, it has since become one of the largest dedicated…

    • Inbodied interaction design example: Smell

      Tom Gayler

      Inbodied interaction design example: Smell

      The sense of smell has long played a minor role in HCI [1]. However, its somewhat limited use could be transformed through an inbodied interaction approach that leverages the physiology of smell—specifically, the possibilities to combine the cogitate, sleep, and eat areas of the in5 model (see article on…

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  • Cover story
    • Inclusive and engaged HCI

      Gillian Hayes

      Inclusive and engaged HCI

      How can we create a world of user experience and HCI that is truly inclusive and that engages with people, problems, and communities in meaningful ways? I gave a talk on these issues at CHI 2019; in this article, I further expand on this line of discussion. Inclusion and…

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  • Special topic: Inbodied interaction
    • Special topic: Inbodied interaction: Introduction

      m.c. schraefel

      Special topic: Inbodied interaction: Introduction

      Inbodied Interaction HCI practitioners are increasingly interested in designing interactive technologies to support the body. At the CHI conference, research around health in particular has grown over the past decade. Once consisting of a session or two on health-related papers, it has since become one of the largest dedicated…

    • Inbodied interaction design example: Smell

      Tom Gayler

      Inbodied interaction design example: Smell

      The sense of smell has long played a minor role in HCI [1]. However, its somewhat limited use could be transformed through an inbodied interaction approach that leverages the physiology of smell—specifically, the possibilities to combine the cogitate, sleep, and eat areas of the in5 model (see article on…

    • Discomfort design

      m.c. schraefel, Aaron Tabor, Elizabeth Murnane

      Discomfort design

      Over the past 30 years, as digital technologies have become both cheaper and near ubiquitous, from computerized environmental controls in buildings, to cellular networks for no-downtime connectivity, to the pervasive smartphone, we have likewise seen the exponential increase of so-called lifestyle diseases: obesity, cardiovascular disease, type II diabetes, chronic…

    • Inbodied interaction design example: Fat tapestry

      Marion Lean

      Inbodied interaction design example: Fat tapestry

      Inbodied interaction focuses on connecting knowledge of how the processes inside our bodies (and around our bodies) affect our everyday performance. An opportunity for design is to explore how we can embody these inbodied processes, making them tangible to help people make sense of, and make choices about, how…

    • Tuning: An Approach for Supporting Healthful Adaptation

      m.c. schraefel, Eric Hekler

      Tuning: An Approach for Supporting Healthful Adaptation

      The foundation of inbodied interaction is adaptation. Our inbodied, complex, nonvolitional processes are always on, always immediately responding and adapting to our context. Inbodied interaction invites us to explore what kind of adaptation we seek to create, as well as where, when, how, and for how long in an…

    • Inbodied interaction design example: Chronobiology-friendly technology

      Elizabeth Murnane

      Inbodied interaction design example: Chronobiology-friendly technology

      Human biology's complex, dynamic inbodied processes are inextricably linked to what we have called the circumbodied. In particular, light is a key circumbodied environmental factor that affects each cell in our body, presenting multiple dimensions for an inbodied interaction designer considering the body as a site of adaptation. For…

    • Toward insourcing-measurement in inbodied interaction design

      m.c. schraefel, Aaron Tabor, Josh Andres

      Toward insourcing-measurement in inbodied interaction design

      We don't know how to measure sleep; the best we can do is ask, "How do you feel?" This was the summary given by Mary Morrell during a seminar on sleep at the Inbodied Interaction Summer School this past August at the University of Southampton, U.K. Her perspective was…

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  • Calendar
    • Featured conferences

      INTR Staff

      Featured conferences

      HCI '20: 33rd International BCS Human-Computer Interaction Conference (Newcastle-under-Lyme, UK) Conference Dates: July 6–10, 2020 https://bcshci2020.com/ Submission Deadlines Full Papers: March 2, 2020 The 2020 conference has a "future interaction" theme, highlighting future interactive challenges and opportunities for future sustainability, future education, and future health. Keele University is excited…

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  • Exit
    • Since you were born (2019)

      Evan Roth

      Since you were born (2019)

      Contributor: Evan Roth Curator/Editor: Anne Spaa Genre: Data history Roth's Internet cache captures four months of search history from the day his second daughter was born on June 29, 2016. The uncensored stream of images present memories that were never intended to be saved, archiving the seemingly incidental into…

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